Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Category : Opinion

Opinion

Too many songs, not enough transformation

Viwe Tyolwana
By Zoleka King We don’t need another song about ending the scourge of gender based violence. I know that  as we approach the annual campaign for 16 Days of Activism against GBV, artists,  companies and organisations are getting ready to put on a show.    I describe this as a show because all we have is a form of performative activism, unless there  is concerted effort to effect real change through policy and laws. I agree that music and art  has played an important role in supporting social courses however this has to extend beyond  the actual music or art piece.   The music and entertainment industry has proven to be one of the worst offenders when  coming to the oppression of women.  The very same producers and record label owners who  help to record these socially conscious songs are in some instances the same characters who  perpetrate the violence.    They can literally put on a mask for the public eye and claim to be drivers of social change  but once the curtain drops and there is no audience, they become violent monsters to women  and children.   For young female artists such as myself, pursuing your dream involves a headache of being  asked for sexual favours and being undermined by your male counterparts. The so called  ‘casting couch’ is still a reality in the entertainment industry because male dominated  structures continue to control the system, leaving women vulnerable and exposed to all sorts  of human rights violations.    Another song or campaign ad with messages encouraging men to be less violent and women  to be more vocal is not going to change the situation. What we need is real reform and